World Cancer Day

Today is World Cancer Day. World Cancer Day takes place every year on 4th February and aims to save millions of preventable deaths each year by raising awareness and education about cancer, and pressing organisations across the world to take action against the disease. According to the Cancer Research UK website, Cancer is the biggest killer worldwide. however research has helped double survival rates in the last 40 years. The day is an ideal opportunity to spread the word and raise the profile of cancer in people’s minds and in the media.

Some game changing cancer treatments, such as Pembrolizumab, the Immunotherapy drug I am currently receiving have only been available in more recent years. My situation would have been very different if I had been diagnosed earlier in life. It’s incredible to think how much the treatment process for melanoma has changed over the last decade. Although huge progress has been made, treatments are painful, debilitating, and for others like me they are long-term.

Sharing my own story doesn’t always come easy to me, as I can be a fairly private person, but I know that is for the benefit of others as well as myself. In some ways blogging about my journey is part of my grief process for the life I once had; expressing myself through my writing is something I previously didn’t think was possible. I really want to make sure something good comes out of this horrific situation.

For me, the metaphorical and physical scars will never been healed; its is as though I am a puzzle which now has a few missing pieces that will never be fully complete again. When I was initially diagnosis with melanoma at 18 I felt my life was over before it had started, but its thanks to pioneering research that I am still here at 30. I know I am one of the lucky ones. Perhaps I don’t fulfil the typical demographic when it comes to my cancer journey, but what is actually considered normal? As they say, so far so good. I have my good and bad days, but I thank my lucky stars every day that I am still alive.

I passionately believe we need to continue research to help find a cure for this awful disease and am beyond grateful to those who dedicate their lives to finding it. I have huge respect for those who continue to raise funds and awareness of all forms of cancer. both individuals and charities such as Cancer Research UK, Macmillan Cancer Support and Trekstock. One day I know a positive result will come from all the hard work.

3 thoughts on “World Cancer Day

  1. Well said. I believe our writings will be seen from future readers as moments of strength and courage, back when cancer wasn’t curable. We are pioneers in a sense, sharing our intimate and vulnerable selves to the world through our blogs.
    Like you, I find writing a cathartic experience. Perhaps our words will offer solace for future generations, describing our battles, when cancer was a serious disease. Always a lesson to be shared.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I only started following your blogs a few months ago due to a friend of a friend so to speak. I’m a good peice older than you at 55 but a like you Ive been dealt the blow of an incurable cancer (for the moment) but like you without all of the research and development in finding cures for these cancer I may not have been so lucky to receive the wonderful care and treatments that have for now prolonged my life. Thank you for being brave and sharing your story as what you say definitely resonates with a lot of other sufferers including me xx

    Liked by 1 person

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