The Cost Of Living

I am now back living in the post holiday world of all work, very little play and many, many hospital appointments. I returned from my trip to America earlier in the week (see my vast array of holiday snaps on my instagram feed) and have already been for two blood tests, to my local pharmacy to pick up a prescription and had an appointment with a nurse at my local GP practice. Next week I’m due to visit Leicester Royal Infirmary for a consultation with my Oncologist and to receive my next dose of Immunotherapy. I also due to go to Cognitive Behavioural Therapy and have another appointment with the nurse at the end of the week. Having stage 4 cancer is a full time job, and it can become really tricky to try and fit everything in around the day-to-day life of someone in their early thirties. I have to make sure I write things down in my phone calendar and my hand written diary just to make sure I don’t miss anything, as it can be all consuming.

Despite my obvious frustrations and the frequency of these appointments it’s all part of my life living with cancer, a term I’ve coined ‘operation stay alive for as long as possible’. Each time I have to remind myself how lucky I am be able to have access to the National Health Service and everything it offers. Despite the constant bad press hospitals up and down the country get about long referral list and A&E waiting times, I still love the NHS.

The NHS turned 70 last week; having been born ten weeks premature I have benefited from various services my whole life and I certainly wouldn’t be living the way I am today without it. The resources that are put into cancer care have kept me alive 8 years after being told I’d probably only have about 18 months to live. I may have to travel a long way for my treatment, which is partly through choice, but I would take that any day over the alternative. My hospital have been amazing from the get go and I feel safe in the hands of the specialist teams there.

The cost for me to live is phenomenal; I read that Pembrolizumab costs over £1000 per 50 mg and the recommended average treatment every three weeks is approx 200mg. It’s definitely not small change! I know I wouldn’t be half as fortunate if I were born in another country, so when I get upset, frustrated and angry on my way to appointments I have to remind myself that the cost of living is high, but I am one of the more fortunate people. I guess it is Ok that there isn’t any free wifi or free parking with a Blue Badge at my local hospital if they are keeping me alive – it’s far cheaper than paying for private treatment elsewhere! My status as a member of the cancer club means I also received my prescriptions free of charge. A few years ago I had two cycles of another drug, Ipilimumab which cost that NHS approx £20,000 per treatment. I was initially meant to have four cycles but my cancer began to grown more rapidly and I had to quickly swap to oral drug Vemurafenib (another costly drug) in order to try and stabilise the disease before it killed me.

According to the latest publicity report the NHS treats more than 1 million patients every 36 hours, the maths to work out how many that is across one year is far too much for me to comprehend. I really hope Brexit doesn’t have a negative affect on the treatment I receive and impact the potential for any newer life extending drugs that may be developed in the future. The NHS and the wonderful people that work for it are there from the moment we enter into the world until the moment we leave. The NHS will treat patients no matter what; it’s a service for everyone regardless of status or background, rich or poor, young or old the NHS caters for all. Here is to another 70 years and more.

Thankful to still being kept alive.

3 thoughts on “The Cost Of Living

  1. Another interesting read Jo, thank you. You have referenced costs a few times here and as you say, those of us in the UK are so very fortunate to be covered by the NHS. Not many people like paying income tax, but the portion that goes to the NHS to help people with serious or minor health problems (or for mental health support) – well that seems incredible value. If I could be sure it would go to the NHS and social care, I’d be happy to pay more. Thanks for blogging 🙂 Pete.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Hi Jo. Yes you are right concerning the NHS. They do get a bad press sometimes , but it’s not the staff as they are truly amazing. Saw the photo post run, .. looking good. Love and support. Bob x

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Jolene You never cease to amaze me, how you manage to do all you do you should be so proud of yourself. I agree wholeheartedly about the NHS long may it continue. Your blogs are a credit to you x x

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s