Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

I recently came to the end of a counselling programme which focussed the talking therapy Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) to help me manage my depression and anxiety. I wrote about starting this journey in an earlier blog post, The Rough And The Smooth a few months ago.

I was initially referred for this treatment at the end of 2017 and I have been attending regular CBT sessions since April in order to help me manage my emotions and thoughts around my cancer diagnosis. It’s not easy to rewire your brain to think in a completely different way, but it’s helped me a lot, and I’m hoping I’ll be able to continue using the techniques I’ve learnt so that I don’t fall back into a negative thought cycle.

Over the past few sessions I’ve practiced various different techniques used in CBT,  one I’ve found particularly useful so far is Thought Challenging. This technique allows a person to look at a situation from alternative angles. By doing this I’ve started to consider things from a more objective point of view, rather than just assuming that my negative thoughts are the complete facts, so not necessarily about just thinking positively in a negative situation, which is often a particular challenge!

A simple example of this may start with a friend cancelling dinner because they’re busy at work. My irrational brain tells me that I am not important enough and worry they think I am boring or I’m constantly talking about my cancer diagnosis or my own issues, therefore I am not a good enough friend to them and they don’t want to see me. So many thoughts run through my mind about the reasons why they cancelled. Keeping a Thought Challenging diary has allowed me to weigh up the for an against and come up with an alternative thought. Now I can be more rational and recognising we’re all busy people, particularly when work comes into play. In the grand scheme of life its simple to reschedule for another time. It’s key for me to remember I am important and that I am lucky to have a lot of people around me who are always there to listen no matter what, even though some live thousands of miles away!

Through this process I’ve learnt that I tend to think in a very black and white way, (know as All-or-nothing thinking) which has had a significant negative impact on my self-esteem, happiness and relationships over the past few years. I’ve tried to overcome this by keeping a list of my negative thoughts and writing down different ones. I have to remind myself that this thought is extreme and in turn come up with one that is more balanced. Another example would be me calling someone and them not picking up the phone; I’ll start to panic that something really bad has happened to them, even though they’re probably just busy at that time. Similarly, if someone says they need to go to the doctors my mind will automatically worry they might have a serious health problem and I constantly fear awful things will happen to my loved ones

During my life with cancer I’ve been taking everything one step (or one PET CT scan) at a time. I’m often surprised I’ve not had a breakdown over the last eight years. Sometimes I get emotional and feel like I’m in full on mid-life crisis mode (I am now in my 30s after all) so CBT has been a great way to try and combat that! I’ve yet to try and revisit my youth, or buy a sports car,  so perhaps I’ve not had a my own crisis moment just yet! I always feel like cancer means ‘I can’t’ do things and there are so many other things ‘I should’ be doing. Thinking in this was is unrealistic and therefore I put too much pressure on myself.

Staying alive is on the top of my priority list, and despite all the challenges that have come my way I’ve succeeded so far. Although difficult at first, CBT has been a lifeline as it has helped me find was of copying with all the negativity my illness throws at me. I am now waiting for a referral for another type of counselling that I hope will help me move forward further. In my last CBT session I wrote down my future goals for the short, medium and long term and I’ll need to keep looking back at it to make sure I’m following my own advice. My first goal over the next six week is to try and maintain a more positive outlook, my recent promising PET CT scan results have been a huge factor, so here goes…

8 thoughts on “Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

  1. Just wanted to let you know that I have been subscribed to your blog since I discovered the channel 4 time to live programme and say thank you for taking the time to write it. I love how honest and open it is.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. You are such an inspirational young lady. My husband was diagnosed in December 2017 with MM and has mets in lots of organs plus brain. After me reading your blogs to him he has become a real fighter. Keep doing what your doing and enjoy life. Lots of love to you from both of us ❤️😘

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  3. Hi Jolene, glad that your CBT has helped you go forward, you must continue with your next course to further your improvement . A brave and courageous lady……. but wait, l know another brave and courageous lady that always inspire me with her strength…..your MUM. Love and support. Bob xx

    Like

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