Melanoma Awareness Month

May is Melanoma Awareness Month, so I thought I would take an opportunity to write about the signs and symptoms. After all, it is the reason I write this blog in the first place.

For those who might not be aware, I was diagnosed with Stage 4 melanoma in September 2010 at the age of 23, having originally been diagnosed with Stage 1 melanoma five years earlier when I was 18. I am almost 32 and have been living with cancer the whole of my adult life. I initially began my blog to share my story and raise awareness, and since then I have appeared in numerous campaigns for cancer charities, featured in a BBC documentary A Time To Live and told my story in the Daily Mail’s You Magazine. I never have, and never will be a sun seeker, but my experience goes to show there is no discrimination when it comes to getting cancer.

When I was diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer, everything felt very out of my control and I felt all my independence was taken away from me. Looking on the bright side, I’ve now been living with my diagnosis for almost 9 years, and in some ways I am stronger than ever. The experience has shaped my whole life, so unsurprisingly I talk and write about it a lot. I struggle with the mental and physical of my diagnosis on a daily basis and are a constant reminder of what I have been through.

Melanoma is a type of cancer that develops in the cells (melanocytes) that produce melanin, the pigment that gives skin its natural colour. Melanin helps to protect the body from UV radiation from the sun. According to the NHS website melanoma is the fifth most common cancer in the UK and there are around 13,500 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed each year. Stats also suggest that more than 2,000 people die every year in the UK from advanced melanoma, which is higher than I expected, although I’ve always been told not to look at the numbers.

Melanoma is caused by skin cells that begin to develop abnormally. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun is thought to cause most melanomas, but there’s also evidence to suggest that some may result from sunbed exposure too. In 2018, Melanoma UK launched a petition for the ban on sunbeds in the UK after a successful ban of commercial sunbeds in Australia. The skin is the bodies largest organ so it’s important to take care of it as best we can. The charity also recommend regular self examinations can help lead to an early diagnosis and in turn increase chances of successful treatment.

The most common sign of melanoma is the appearance of a new mole or a change in an existing mole which can occur anywhere on the body. In my case, I had a suspicious mole removed form my neck in 2005. The NHS website has a handy guide on what to look out for which is detailed below.

ABCDE

  • Asymmetry – the two halves of the area may differ in shape
  • Border – the edges of the area may be irregular or blurred, and sometimes show notches
  • Colour – this may be uneven. Different shades of black, brown and pink may be seen
  • Diameter – most melanomas are at least 6mm in diameter. Report any change in size, shape or diameter to your doctor
  • Elevation or enlargement – some melanomas increase in size and may then become raised above the surface of the skin. Sometimes the mole can remain the same size and the area around or under it can appear to swell.

Follow Melanoma UK on twitter to find out more about Melanoma Awareness Month. It’s not ‘just’ skin cancer.

Why Everybody Needs To Wear Sun Cream

The recent change in the weather and the feeling of summer in the air has made me think more about the importance of wearing sun cream. Its important to highlight just how dangerous sun exposure or the desire for a tan could be. Although over-exposure to the sun is not how I got Melanoma, it would be silly for me not to start talking about it, as its something I think about frequently. In some cases situations such as mine could be avoided or prevented altogether, and I don’t want any one else to go through an ordeal such as the one I’ve been going through for the past 11 years.

I’ve spent many sleepless nights wondering if there was anything I could have done to stop this from happening to me, I think the ‘what if’ question will always be there at the back of my mind, along with a pang of guilt for the situation I now find myself in. I’ve never been a sun worshipper, and always cover up as much as possible, but the worry will always be present. I’ve been told my Melanoma would have developed regardless of the climate I live in. Still, regardless It’s easy to know the right thing to do after something has happened, but it’s always hard to predict the future.

As the summer weather reaches it peak I have a feeling I will see more news articles and images of sun burnt brits on social media often accompanied by laughing emojis or captions such as “LOL”. It’s difficult to comprehend why people don’t take this seriously, its no laughing matter. According to the Macmillan website, each year about 14,500 people in the UK are diagnosed with Melanoma, and it is one of the most common cancers in young people aged 15 to 34.

Often skin damage doesn’t show up straight away, perhaps a few weeks, months or even years later, with increased fine lines and wrinkles, and even skin discolouration. It is a vital part of a skin care routine which often gets forgotten about. Wearing sunscreen on a daily basis is the best thing to do to keep skin looking youthful and healthy. I know many people who wouldn’t go out of the house without make-up but chose not to protect their skin against UV radiation. If I am being truly honest it baffles and upsets me that people don’t take this seriously despite knowing about my Stage 4 diagnosis. It’s not healthy or good for a persons to expose themselves to such extreme conditions which our bodies are not built for. Our skin is the largest and fastest-growing organ and needs protecting just the same as the other organs in our body. Cancer does not discriminate, not matter who you are. Bob Marley passed away from Melanoma in 1981 after it began under the nail of one of his toes. It just goes to show we are all at risk no matter what climate we live in or ethnic background we come from.

I so grateful that my Mum made me get my suspicious mole on my neck looked at when I was younger. Once she spoke to me about it I developed a bad feeling about it almost instantly. I remember clearly raising these concerns with my Dad when staying at his house one weekend. I’m fortunate that the GP referred me so quickly, It just goes to show that If you have an overwhelming feeling that something isn’t quite right, you should trust their instincts and pay a visit to the GP. As the saying goes, if at first you don’t succeed, try, try again. I for one know my own body and what feels right or wrong. Often others seem hesitate to book a GP appointment because they consider their aliment to be something minor, or not worthy of the time of a professional, and we all know how stretched the NHS is. I’ve learnt that nothing is minor when it comes to your health and wellbeing, it is what the service is there for in the first place after all. When I was diagnosed with a brain tumour I had a few friends tell me that it prompted them show suspicious moles to their Doctors.  I know people who have since had moles removed as a result of a routine visit to the GP. Action such as this are great, and I am pleased people have been so proactive, but it shouldn’t take such an life altering event for this to have an effect on people. If in doubt, get it checked out!

I am fighting to stay alive due to an illness that is beyond my control, but there is a chance for others that it could be prevented. The side effects such as nausea, fatigue, diarrhoea, hair loss, rashes, joint pain, itching, headaches and reduced appetite are bad enough let alone the stress and physical and mental trauma of actually going for treatment at hospital every three weeks.

Naturally people should continue to enjoy the sunshine over the next few months if they wish, but I would ask anyone reading this think twice before heading outside without sun protection. I hope most of the tans I will see are from a spray can or bottle.