The New CRUK Obesity Campaign

Over the past couple of weeks a few people have asked me my thoughts on the latest ad campaign by Cancer Research UK, highlight obesity as a leading cause of cancer.

A couple of weeks ago Cancer Research UK released new figures showing that excess weight is now fuelling over 4,000 more cases of bowel, kidney, ovarian and liver cancer than those caused by smoking. Its a shocking statistic and I think the national campaign is pretty hard-hitting.

Part of the new campaign is a billboard poster advert showing cigarette packets in which brand names had been replaced by the word obesity. At first glance this looks like an advert for Malboro Lights or Silk Cut but look again and you will see something very different. A direct and harsh message designed to grab the viewers attention.

Cancer Research UK say that by implementing this campaign, they are calling for a change in policy, asking the government to lead the way in providing an environment which makes it easier to maintain a healthy balanced weight. The ambition is for the government to halve childhood obesity rates by 2030, and also to introduce a 9pm watershed for junk food ads on TV and online. I agree with this wholeheartedly, however it has left a bad taste in peoples mouths, with some suggestions the ads are ‘fat-shaming’.

I think the campaign is clear and clever, but I hope it doesn’t lead to people hiding away, feeling ashamed of their weight, and not getting help when it may be needed. There needs to be some guidance as to where people can get help if they need it. We are in a era of body positivity so people shouldn’t be made to feel singled out because of how they look. Male or female, obese or underweight, tall or short, we are all at risk. Over the years I’ve toyed with negative thoughts that somehow its my own fault I have cancer, although I’ve been assured multiple times there is nothing I could’ve done to prevent it, it isn’t nice to play the blame game. No body who gets cancer should ever feel it is their own fault.

Cancer is a complex disease and its not often linked to one particular element, and not only those who smoke or are obese get cancer. I sit here writing this as someone who seemed completely healthy when I was a initially diagnosed as a teenager; I hardly ever drank alcohol (in later years I was always the one who drove on nights our), I had a healthy lifestyle of a busy young adult and I certainly wasn’t over weight. I also have never been a sun worshipper, but I still got melanoma. I know people who have lung cancer who have never smoked in their lives, which just goes to show how there is still so much to learn about cancer. There are so many different forms of cancer that to highlight obesity as a cause for all is completely wrong.

Having said this, I like a message which grabs peoples attention, which makes them sit up and think; and I think the obesity campaign does this well. I’d love for a big campaign like this to support Melanoma UK in the ban on sunbeds, or to highlight just how damaging getting sunburnt can be for our health. It would be great to see the UK follow the lead of Australia and ban the use of commercial sunbeds. Although exposure to UV radiation from the sun or sunbeds are the main risk factors for developing melanoma, they are not the only ones. There are many things that may lead to the development of melanoma, as there are with other cancers.

World Cancer Day

Today is World Cancer Day. World Cancer Day takes place every year on 4th February and aims to save millions of preventable deaths each year by raising awareness and education about cancer, and pressing organisations across the world to take action against the disease. According to the Cancer Research UK website, Cancer is the biggest killer worldwide. however research has helped double survival rates in the last 40 years. The day is an ideal opportunity to spread the word and raise the profile of cancer in people’s minds and in the media.

Some game changing cancer treatments, such as Pembrolizumab, the Immunotherapy drug I am currently receiving have only been available in more recent years. My situation would have been very different if I had been diagnosed earlier in life. It’s incredible to think how much the treatment process for melanoma has changed over the last decade. Although huge progress has been made, treatments are painful, debilitating, and for others like me they are long-term.

Sharing my own story doesn’t always come easy to me, as I can be a fairly private person, but I know that is for the benefit of others as well as myself. In some ways blogging about my journey is part of my grief process for the life I once had; expressing myself through my writing is something I previously didn’t think was possible. I really want to make sure something good comes out of this horrific situation.

For me, the metaphorical and physical scars will never been healed; its is as though I am a puzzle which now has a few missing pieces that will never be fully complete again. When I was initially diagnosis with melanoma at 18 I felt my life was over before it had started, but its thanks to pioneering research that I am still here at 30. I know I am one of the lucky ones. Perhaps I don’t fulfil the typical demographic when it comes to my cancer journey, but what is actually considered normal? As they say, so far so good. I have my good and bad days, but I thank my lucky stars every day that I am still alive.

I passionately believe we need to continue research to help find a cure for this awful disease and am beyond grateful to those who dedicate their lives to finding it. I have huge respect for those who continue to raise funds and awareness of all forms of cancer. both individuals and charities such as Cancer Research UK, Macmillan Cancer Support and Trekstock. One day I know a positive result will come from all the hard work.