The Beauty Of Friendship

I’ve always known how important my friends are, but the last few weeks have highlighted just how lucky I am to have a solid cohort of friends behind me.

I am lucky to have spent last weekend with some of my oldest friends, and no matter how much times passes our friendships remain intact. We may not see each other often, but we are still there for each other in times of need (thank goodness for mobile phones and what’s app).

The vast majority of my friends are well and truly settle down and some have children too. I am very aware I’m a fair few stages behind when it comes to these matters and I always count my cancer diagnosis as part of the reason for this. It’s shaped who I am today, much like my friends own experiences, but ultimately we still have a close bond.

The great thing about our friendship is that we love and respect each other, even if we don’t always have the same opinions. We don’t all have the same interests either; I love theatre, eating out, and travelling, but I am not a fan of Love Island, and it doesn’t matter. As teenagers we had similar interests, such as being old enough to go out in town and go drinking for the first time, it was fun at the time but as adults we embrace our differences. I prefer to stay in and watch Netflix than go out to a bar, and that’s ok too. We’ve learnt to embrace our differences, and it’s probably one of the reasons we have stayed friends, each to their own after all! We are all individuals however together we work. I am lucky to have many friends from my school days, some that have stayed in the midlands and other who live close by in London. I was also lucky to find some wonderful friends and University too, as well as in the various jobs I’ve done since graduating.

In the last month I have caught up with two friends who have visited the UK from Australia, one from Japan and two from America. These are not people who are in my life of a daily basis, and I met them and different times during my life, but despite the distance they are frequently in my thoughts. We communicate as often as we can, sending long updates about life via what’s app it that occasional Skype call.

I often wonder where in the world I would be be without these people? Nothing compares friends getting together for a good catch up full of laughter, and last weekend was no exception.

True friends are those you can be 100% honest with, and they still like you anyway despite what they know. These friends are people you can sit in silence with for hours and it not be awkward. These are the ones who will be with you during the best and worst times and lift you up when you are in a bad place. I’ve had my fair share of rough rides and I am eternally grateful to those people.

Some friends are relatively new ones, but they are just as important to me.  During an average week I spend more of my time and work and socialising with friends than seeing family which makes friendship (and of course family) so key to my overall happiness. I feel fortunate that I have those I can confide in, act like counsellors, and overall support systems. I am always trying my best to be a good friend in return.

Whilst I await my next PET CT scan results I am forever grateful to my wonderful friends for keeping me sane.

Flying Solo

Next month I am flying solo in more ways than one. I’m heading off to Asia for a wedding, and then doing a little bit of travelling alone. Being a stage 4 patient the thought of being in another country travelling solo is petrifying, especially when it’s to countries I’ve not been to before. I keep waking up in the night panicking that I’m going to die on my travels with none of my family around me, this probably seems ludicrous to others, but it’s something that has been playing on my mind. No matter how much I try this always niggles at me when I’m far away. Realistically, I don’t want to travel alone but I am sure it’ll be an amazing experience, I didn’t go travelling during my last minute gap year so It seemed like too good an opportunity to pass up. I had a bit of a YOLO (you only live once) and FOMO (fear of missing out) moment when booking the trip around a year ago. I just kept hoping I would be around and well enough to see it through, and thankfully I am.

I begin my trip at a wedding with around 40 other guests, including spending the first part of the trip with some very close friends, so I won’t be short of people to chat to and share experiences with there. It’s been a long time coming and I literally cannot wait to spend quality time with friends! I also end my two week trip in good company, which is very lucky. I’m spending about 7 days on my own in total, and although I’ve travelled to places by myself to meet friends before, I’ve never spend that much time exploring alone. I am a little apprehensive about it, but there is no backing out now. A few years ago I spent three days in Barcelona on my own, I loved the city but I missed sharing the experience with another person.

I’ve chosen to travel alone because I may not have much time left; I love going on holiday and always want people accompany me, but I want to seize the day and create some good memories of life outside of the terminal illness vortex, companion or no companion. I am yet to figure out exactly what I am going to do yet, but I do love a plan! I have my bridesmaids dress, factor 50 sun cream, malaria tablets and new camera at the ready, and I intend on spending this weekend looking at guide books and scouring the World Wide Web to find out more about my go place and activities for each destination.

I am sure its going to be an amazing once in a life time trip, and I’d rather travel alone than not go at all. It would’ve been nice to have someone to share the experience with, but I didn’t want to miss out just because I’m single. I’ve been told by many experienced travellers I’m bound to meet people along the way, but if I don’t that’s ok by me. I just hope I don’t end up talking to myself too much!

Being single is a lonely, especially at 31, but so is living with incurable cancer and the two do not make for a great combination. As mention in my blog post Singles Awareness Day back in February, I feel due to my cancer diagnosis I cannot offer a future to someone else. I honestly can’t imagine having a permanent holiday companion and a plus one for life.

As we get older the stakes are higher, I’m sure there are loads of men out there with baggage, but the reality is my diagnosis creates a huge barrier. As we get older it becomes increasingly frustrating; the pool of soul mates keeps getting smaller and smaller, but my illness prevents me from letting my guard down. Maybe I have focussed too much on working and keeping sane that way? but nowadays it feels like there is a time pressure on finding someone and settling down. With life being so uncertain and fragile it feels like I have nothing to offer in that way. Who wants a life with terminal cancer patient on active treatment and on medication for depression anyway? Like it or not there is a huge stigma about being a single female in your thirties, all of a sudden it feels alienating, and with cancer on top this is a total nightmare!

At my age people start thinking more in the long term, I’m in the minority with most of my friends who are settled down. Personally, I cannot think in the long term; I feel like it doesn’t exist in my world, so how I am meant to move forward?. Having cancer has taken so much from me, not just having a wedding / holiday companion but the overall prospect of a relationship and starting a family. Cancer won’t ever let go of my life, there is no remission or stopping treatment in sight and I have to accept that I may never meet a man and settle down. The short answer is I can’t. I am not at the same stage as my peers, although part of me is relieved that a boyfriend isn’t going to be dragged through this living nightmare, the future does feel lonely. It isn’t so much that dating is on my mind, but singleness definitely is.

I’ve heard of people in unhappy relationships who have experienced a light bulb moment post diagnosis and left their partner, having a new found appreciation for life. I feel I didn’t even get the chance to really begin the search for ‘the one’. For me, the sky isn’t more blue, the grass doesn’t looked greener and I’m probably not appreciating the small things in life as much as other people, quite frankly I don’t like the feeling of sand between my toes – it’s too hot and it gets everywhere!

Having said that, of all the bad things cancer has given me I’ve certainly been shown a lot of love and compassion over the years. I am fortunate that there are some wonderful people in the world experiencing this awful journey with me, even if they aren’t my wedding plus one.

Finding My Focus

With 2018 now in full swing, some people choose to make resolutions moving forward. For those who are experiencing cancer, or have been affected by it in the past, these resolutions aren’t always about creating new hobbies, such as taking a photograph every day for a year, taking the stairs at work rather than the lift, or going to the gym more.

So far this year I have started cutting back on things in my diary, rather than doing more. Starting a new job with more hours is really challenging for anyone, so I’m trying to stay one step ahead at all times, and finally learning when to say no rather than being a yes man. If I think too much activity is going to jeopardise my health and make me more fatigued, particularly in the winter months, I’m going to say no. I already feel better for making this conscious choice, therefore the prospect of a 40 hour working week doesn’t seem as daunting any more.

I always like to keep people on side and agree to everything (I love brunch and eating out too much), but with a terminal illness it isn’t practical to say yes so often. I am trying to regain my focus and think about what is really important. Previously my attitude would have been that I am admitting defeat by saying no, but really it is learning to look at something from another angle. Despite always wanting to please people and be liked, I already feel much happier and brighter with more sleep and planning down time in my diary. I need my body and brain to function well so I can concentrate on learning my new role, making sure I am not feeling exhausted by lunchtime.

By taking a break for over filling my social calendar, I can really enjoy spending with the people I can about. It has now become more about quality time than quantity. A couple of friends came to stay with me London at the weekend, usually I feel the pressure of being a host and having to show people all the favourite tourist spots, but coffee and chilled out catch ups in pyjamas were just what was needed. I am sure that this will not always be so easy for me, but my health is my number one priority, and I think I’ve forgotten that at points over the past year. I’m starting to feel much better than I have done over the past few months just by making this choice and forming a new routine. Who knew that having breakfast before setting off for work rather than at my desk would make such a difference?!

There are only 24 hours in a day, of course it would be easier if we had an extra day a week, but time is limited. If I’m spending enough time sleeping, and around hour and half travelling to and from work, and another eight or so at my desk Monday to Friday, that doesn’t leave too much time for relaxation and leisure activities. Going for my treatment exhausts me for about a week, then after a break the cycle begins all over again. I’d ask that people don’t write me off just yet, I still want to be included, but I need time to adjust to a new regime, so If I’ve been less responsive this is most likely the reason why. I really appreciate texts, cards, home visits and coffee dates, and I promise I will see everyone, it just might take a little longer to find a time that works with my new routine.

New Year Challenges

After deciding against another running challenge in 2018, my lovely school friend Emilie has taken one on and is doing the Brighton Marathon to raise funds for Macmillan in April. I’m proud of one of my oldest friend for taking on this marathon challenge  (pun intended) and I’ll be going to cheer her on during the race. You can find out Em’s story here.

Macmillan have been a huge source of support for me, from my Skin Cancer specialist nurse to various online resources and assistance with various different application forms. I’m really appreciate Emilie’s dedication to a cause that’s so close to home. Later in the year I am going abroad for her wedding to be a bridesmaid so it’s set to be an epic 2018.

I’ve decided take on a different challenge in the new year and I am hoping to do the Lake District 5 Peak Challenge with Trekstock later in the year. I’ve never been to the Lake District before, so I thought it would be a great way of doing something new whilst also raising awareness for young people like me experiencing cancer. Over the past 15 months I’ve received a lot of support from the small London based team which has been invaluable. The challenge runs over one day. The climb goes up to over 3,000 feet, covering approximately 14 miles. I need to work out some sort of training that might help. Any one up for a walk around Hyde Park with a large backpack?

I am seeing in the new year by relaxing at home, which seems like a nice chilled out end to 2017. I am keeping everything crossed that my cancer will continue to be stable in 2018 as I have new opportunities and adventures in the pipe line!