September Sadness

This month has gone very quickly, having been away on an exciting work trip to Japan I am now back in the real world. My three year blogging anniversary took place whilst I was away. The past year has been the most significant as I stopped taking Immunotherapy drug Pembrolizumab, having had my last infusion in December 2018 and my last major surgery during the summer of 2016.

September is also very significant as it marks exactly 14 years since I was initially diagnosed with stage 1 melanoma aged 18. I have now been living as a stage 4 patient for almost 9 years, with the end of next month marking the date I was told my diagnosis was Stage 4 cancer and I had to have two major operations to remove a lung tumour and brain tumour which had been growing inside me during my final year at University.

September is a month full of various triggers and cancer related anniversaries, when I was diagnosed in 2010 I thought I may not make it to 24 or 25, and now I’m 32! I woke up this morning, or in the middle of the night with it being 4am, still jet lagged from my long flight home. My work trip and travelling bubble has well and truly burst. For me, September is full of sadness and so many bad memories which have changed the course of my life forever. In this case i’m not sure if the memories fade or that time heals old wounds, but it really doesn’t feel like it today! My wounds are sore and as raw as ever right now.

I try my best not to think about the more distant future, but no matter how much time passes I still feel like I am looking down the barrel of a loaded gun every day, being away from London and my ‘normal’ life allows me to switch off a little, and there is a sense hope. Travelling home I started to think about my next long haul trip to America in 2020, and I am trying not to panic that something dreadful will happen between now and then which means I won’t actually go.

I am due a PET CT scan within the next month, and am awaiting a date for my MRI scan too, and will get the results at the start of November. I am starting to worry now that I know the date, particularly with the recent news about the hot spots of my last scan. Today I am full of misery and fear about what could be.

I’ve only been home five minutes but my mind has started experiencing certain triggers that are very distressing. This morning I discovered some hair in the shower plug hole and although this is totally normal I immediately had a flashback from when my hair started falling out about five years ago. September is a month when I think about my diagnosis and the impact it has on my life even more. I really hope October will be easier!

Melanoma Awareness Month

May is Melanoma Awareness Month, so I thought I would take an opportunity to write about the signs and symptoms. After all, it is the reason I write this blog in the first place.

For those who might not be aware, I was diagnosed with Stage 4 melanoma in September 2010 at the age of 23, having originally been diagnosed with Stage 1 melanoma five years earlier when I was 18. I am almost 32 and have been living with cancer the whole of my adult life. I initially began my blog to share my story and raise awareness, and since then I have appeared in numerous campaigns for cancer charities, featured in a BBC documentary A Time To Live and told my story in the Daily Mail’s You Magazine. I never have, and never will be a sun seeker, but my experience goes to show there is no discrimination when it comes to getting cancer.

When I was diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer, everything felt very out of my control and I felt all my independence was taken away from me. Looking on the bright side, I’ve now been living with my diagnosis for almost 9 years, and in some ways I am stronger than ever. The experience has shaped my whole life, so unsurprisingly I talk and write about it a lot. I struggle with the mental and physical of my diagnosis on a daily basis and are a constant reminder of what I have been through.

Melanoma is a type of cancer that develops in the cells (melanocytes) that produce melanin, the pigment that gives skin its natural colour. Melanin helps to protect the body from UV radiation from the sun. According to the NHS website melanoma is the fifth most common cancer in the UK and there are around 13,500 new cases of melanoma are diagnosed each year. Stats also suggest that more than 2,000 people die every year in the UK from advanced melanoma, which is higher than I expected, although I’ve always been told not to look at the numbers.

Melanoma is caused by skin cells that begin to develop abnormally. Exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun is thought to cause most melanomas, but there’s also evidence to suggest that some may result from sunbed exposure too. In 2018, Melanoma UK launched a petition for the ban on sunbeds in the UK after a successful ban of commercial sunbeds in Australia. The skin is the bodies largest organ so it’s important to take care of it as best we can. The charity also recommend regular self examinations can help lead to an early diagnosis and in turn increase chances of successful treatment.

The most common sign of melanoma is the appearance of a new mole or a change in an existing mole which can occur anywhere on the body. In my case, I had a suspicious mole removed form my neck in 2005. The NHS website has a handy guide on what to look out for which is detailed below.

ABCDE

  • Asymmetry – the two halves of the area may differ in shape
  • Border – the edges of the area may be irregular or blurred, and sometimes show notches
  • Colour – this may be uneven. Different shades of black, brown and pink may be seen
  • Diameter – most melanomas are at least 6mm in diameter. Report any change in size, shape or diameter to your doctor
  • Elevation or enlargement – some melanomas increase in size and may then become raised above the surface of the skin. Sometimes the mole can remain the same size and the area around or under it can appear to swell.

Follow Melanoma UK on twitter to find out more about Melanoma Awareness Month. It’s not ‘just’ skin cancer.